Category Archives: Doing the ‘right’ thing

Taking account of the new year

As the new year starts and we put energy into achieving our goals, we need to quarantine some energy for integrity checks. In the rush and enthusiasm to move forward, sometimes we forget all the aspects of our behaviour for which we can be held to account.

We often feel that if  our work has progressed, it is all OK. All OK at the moment. But what if we were held to account for the ‘bright and shiny’ new work 5 or even 10 or 15 years later? What would the moral compass of that time find fault with?  And would we have to explain ourselves in retrospect, with a whole new moral compass. Being a public officer has this potential.

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Performance, sleep and Alzheimers alert

Early Alzheimers may just look like fragmented performance.

It’s Alzheimers Awareness month. Early onset Alzheimers in workplaces is a considerable challenge for managers to ethically manage.

We’ve all heard about Alzheimers. But it seems so far away from us; from our work and performance. Sadly, recent research is showing that most people present for testing so late in the progression of the disease that they really reduce the chance of slowing it. The ray of hope though, is that research is currently indicating quite clearly what the risk factors are. Most are risks we can manage, hence delaying the onset of the effect on our performance.

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When confidence becomes overconfidence

When does confidence become overconfidence? Overconfident people rarely check if others agree with them. They assume they’re right and often give advice a little too freely; putting themselves at risk of treading on others’ toes, possibly even being accused of bullying.

So when does just having confidence change to being overconfident? Sadly it can happen so incrementally that it insidiously creeps up on us. Continue reading

Been accused of being ‘abrasive’?

Been accused of being ‘abrasive’ or ‘needing to work on your people skills’?

Practitioners assisting managers in this field are increasingly encouraging senior executives and HR professionals to see this situation as one in which ‘functional’ and ‘dysfunctional’ use of our strengths has caused an issue and is highly resolvable.

Your drive and determination to achieve results may be deeply valued by your superiors, but deeply threatening to others around you. That is, your approach is highly functional in one work domain but highly dysfunctional in others. For our counsellors this is a commonly occurring human problem and very much a resolvable one.

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Or contact us through our confidential contact page for more personalised assistance: http://managersassistance.com.au/contact-form-7-id53-titlecontact-form-1contact/

What is the ‘right’ thing?

Taking Accountable & Ethical Decision Making to the Next Level

Anyone who has worked in government for the past few years will have come across training for Accountable and Ethical Decision Making in some format; whether it is online, or our preferred method, face to face. Training about accountable and ethical decision making is becoming increasingly important for government agencies who are aiming to maintain high standards of integrity and protect their reputation as impartial, unbiased providers of services in the public interest.

But do your staff apply these accountability concepts to their everyday work practices, every time?

Are you comfortable that your staff are clear about what is the ‘right’ thing to do in every work situation? 

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